Home > Desktop > Opera 9.1 to include Real-Time Fraud Protection

Opera 9.1 to include Real-Time Fraud Protection

October 18, 2006

At the Opera Backstage event in London today it was revealed that Opera 9.1 will include built-in Fraud Protection for fraudulent sites.

Opera’s Fraud Protection will work differently than Firefox and Internet Explorer’s (IE) anti-phishing protection. In Opera, when you type a URL in the address bar, while the page is being requested from the web server, Opera will simultaneously access Opera’s database to check the legitimacy of the site you want to visit.

If the site is determined to be a fraud, Opera will instead display a warning and block you from visiting the site. You’ll still have the option to bypass the warning.

Unlike Firefox, which by default only checks against a pre-downloaded blacklist of fraud sites, Opera does the checking in real-time so you’ll be protected against new fraud sites that pop-up each day.

Opera gets the site fraud/legitimacy information from a database supplied by GeoTrust, a company with a long experience in anti-fraud solutions.

For those concerned about privacy, Opera will send only a limited amount of information to Opera’s server in plain text, so that you can inspect yourself the information Opera sees about your browsing details (if you feel paranoid).

Speed should not be affected, according to Johan Borg – Opera’s Desktop Manager, since everything is done asynchronously and the content load is really minimal.

The warning box looks pretty simple and should definitely catch your attention. The current warning box (see screenshot below) and icons are still under development; I hope it doesn’t get too complicated to use for the average non-techie user.

You can read some more technical details on how it’s implemented, and why Opera didn’t opt to implement it like Firefox and IE on the official Opera blog post by the desktop team.

Fraud and phishing protection in the Opera browser has been one of the more requested features that Opera users have asked when Opera solicited feature/requirement requests a few months back. It’s good to see Opera paying attention to its users.


Internal-build screenshot of Opera 9.1
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Categories: Desktop
  1. blah99
    October 18, 2006 at 1:17 am

    thats f*ckin ugly compared the firefox phishing filter.

  2. October 18, 2006 at 1:39 am

    thats f*ckin ugly compared the firefox phishing filter.

    It’s a temporary design.

  3. TheMajor
    October 18, 2006 at 4:33 am

    I thought Opera already had phishing protection? (the illegal-URL# thing).

  4. Bo
    October 18, 2006 at 5:41 am

    > (the illegal-URL# thing)

    That has nothing to do with phishing. AFAIK it’s only for malformed URLs.
     

    On Topic: I don’t like the idea, that Opera checks the visited sites in real-time. I trust Opera (I’m using Opera Mini :-)) and they way they deal with privacy concerns is the best they could have with this approach.
    But I’ll disable this feature. I don’t need fraud protection anyway. A frequently updated blacklist wouldn’t be much less up-to-date but better regarding performance and privacy.

  5. Bo
    October 18, 2006 at 5:43 am

    Sorry for the second post, but I like to add, that fraud proctection is generally a good idea.
    I think I’ll leave it on for my family even with my concerns. They’ll like the “extra-security”.

  6. EC
    October 18, 2006 at 8:33 am

    I don’t get why Opera has to be different – can’t they just call it a phishing filter, or at least display that word on the page?

    What’s with the wording (fraudulent and the fraud filter)?

  7. October 18, 2006 at 8:46 am

    EC, I suppose most non-techie users would have no clue about the meaning of ‘phishing’.

  8. October 18, 2006 at 8:55 am

    non-troppo wrote in the desktop team blog about something called “adaptive zoom”. Do you have any details on that ?

  9. October 18, 2006 at 6:32 pm

    Great news for Opera browser, this way we’ll remain on top feature wise! But seriously I never found a site that would trigger such protection and on IE7 for example I have it disabled there.

    The only way you can fall on one of those is if you mis-type an URL or click a link in an email.

  10. XPecto
    October 18, 2006 at 8:31 pm

    Being the actually the best browser opera seems to be criticised by the community
    just cause it wasn’t the free browser at first

  11. Kyhwana
    October 18, 2006 at 8:49 pm

    Actually, firefox 2 will let you choose to use a pre-downloaded list or use a provider (in this case google) to check in real time if the site you’re going to is a phising/malware site.
    (Tools/options/Security)

    But as you say, by default it uses the downloaded list. Could you clarify the first sentance about Firefox at all? It’s kind of inaccurate.

  12. Caligula
    October 19, 2006 at 12:58 am

    When can you download 9.1 version.?

  13. October 19, 2006 at 1:48 am

    Just give a user an option to use this feature or not. I don’t want to use that option all the time, so there should be a setting that allows me to select/de-selet such checking.

  14. October 19, 2006 at 5:38 am

    Caligula: When It’s Ready. 🙂

    In the meantime, you really ought to upgrade to Opera 9.02, since it provides many fixes and new features.

  15. eric
    October 19, 2006 at 8:41 am

    i been inloved with opera since its early days, keep up the good work guys.

  16. October 19, 2006 at 12:08 pm

    I don’t really use Opera. My commonly used browsers are Firefox and Internet Explorer. However, these days I do see Opera getting better, and perhaps in no time, I may find myself switching to use use Opera.

  17. Devz0r
    October 19, 2006 at 3:44 pm

    An idea for how to better present it:

    Have the beta style of managing widgets (shade of black over the web page) cover the site and have popup that says “Suspected Site Fraud… etc. etc. etc.” and have options of dealing with it.

  18. October 20, 2006 at 2:38 pm

    Daniel, Firefox also is capable of doing this real-time (Choose Ask Google Option). However it’s defaulted to the Pre-Downloaded List
    Also do you if it’s Heuristic Based (like IE7).

    Nice move on Opera’s part calling it “Fraud Protection”

    Also to the guy who’s complaining, Why does Opera have to be different, Firefox calls it “Web-Site Forgery” not Phishing.

  19. October 24, 2006 at 4:04 am

    Good idea, but I hope it’s disabled by default. I noticed that IE7’s anti-phishing feature slows down the loading of webpages.

  20. October 25, 2006 at 1:14 pm

    I don’t like the idea, that Opera checks the visited sites in real-time. I trust Opera (I’m using Opera Mini ) and they way they deal with privacy concerns is the best they could have with this approach.
    But I’ll disable this feature. I don’t need fraud protection anyway. A frequently updated blacklist wouldn’t be much less up-to-date but better regarding performance and privacy.

    Well, I think that’s your personal choice — as long as most people need this feature, or can be useful to them.
    And about the method, I think Opera has done right to check from their servers. Why? Because I think a downloaded black-list can be simply hacked by a new fraudulent script or something..

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