Home > Uncategorized > Opera Platform brings AJAX applications to the mobile phone

Opera Platform brings AJAX applications to the mobile phone

November 15, 2005

Opera today released a beta version of Opera Platform SDK, a software development kit for developing and running Web applications on mobile phones.

Opera Platform allows developers to create platform independent applications based on well known Web technologies such as HTML, CSS and JavaScript. The combination of these technologies is popularly referred to as AJAX. AJAX is a Web development technique that is increasingly used to develop new Internet services such as Google Maps and Gmail.

One of the developers who worked on the Opera Platform, Arve Bersvendsen, has written a short summary of the features and capabilities it has.

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  1. November 15, 2005 at 6:59 pm

    Since the bandwidth in mobile phone is so small, I don’t think AJAX is the right technology for phone.

  2. Anonymous
    November 16, 2005 at 5:15 am

    I take it that you are an expert, then, and know everything about mobiles, AJAX and so on?

    Bandwidth is exactly what one saves:

    “By storing an AJAX application on the mobile phone and allowing XML-communication with a Web-server, the traditional bandwidth constraints become less of an issue.”

    You can update only what you need to update, instead of downloading everything again.

    I am puzzled to see a Firefox fan constantly making these strange and misinformed comments about Opera…

  3. November 16, 2005 at 5:27 am

    I actually agree with minghong.

    The reason for which he probably made his comment about AJAX causing bandwidth issues when used on a cell phone is probably because AJAX is the combined use of xml/javascript/xhtml.

    Why those technologies pose a risk is simply because they are all client side technologies and will put the load on the client (the cell phone).

    I personally think Opera should develop an cell phone app API that makes use of server-side technologies , like Opera Mini which *does* use a serverside technology, that of course being Java.

    Daniel DeVaney
    http://www.dandevaney.com

  4. Anonymous
    November 16, 2005 at 5:42 am

    Well, TODAY bandwidth on cell phones is by and large still small, but tomorrow it won’t. Einstein said that we cannot solve today’s problem by thinking the way we thought when we created them, and this is a case in point. You never build anything for today or yesterday, but for tomorrow. And that’s what Opera is doing.

    – Helmar

  5. Anonymous
    November 16, 2005 at 1:56 pm

    Yet another funny post by minghong, our favorite FF fanboy; you gotta love him and his posts…

  6. November 16, 2005 at 2:17 pm

    I would agree with what Helmar worte. But in addition to that, it’s also worth noting that AJAX is also useful to make websites behave like desktop applications, by not refreshing the page.

  7. November 16, 2005 at 4:35 pm

    Here is a quote from a Cnet article on this.

    A recent investigation by ZDNet UK showed that roaming data charges can be several times higher than standard rates, so reducing the bandwidth needed for applications would be welcome for international travellers.

  8. November 17, 2005 at 9:12 pm

    Do you just hate those anonymous poster? 😉

    While the initial download may be small for the “AJAX” application, the total download used can be huge, if the application keeps polling the server. And that is expensive in term of money.

    P.S. I think Minimo also bring AJAX application to mobile phone, so what’s the big deal here?

  9. Anonymous
    November 18, 2005 at 5:28 am

    People are missing the point.

    Sure, you can use Ajax over the net. But the fact is that it can be used locally too. This isn’t just to create web pages, it’s about using Ajax to interface with the phone. You have this as the basis of your phone UI.

    What the big deal is? Easier application development on mobiles of course.

    And Minimo on mobiles? Hehe, that’ll be the day 😉

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