Home > Uncategorized > Microsoft feels snubbed after Opera's acid2 challenge

Microsoft feels snubbed after Opera's acid2 challenge

March 17, 2005

After Opera’s CTO, Hakon Wium Lie, proposed the Acid2 challenge for Internet Explorer (IE) 7, there has been some grumbling over at Microsoft.

Microsoft’s Robert Scoble, in his blog complains about the manner in which it was announced. In particular, why did the Web Standards Project (WaSP), which will be sponsoring the acid2 test, go public with the announcement first instead of approaching the people over at Microsoft? “That tells me they care more about PR than really working with browser vendors to improve things for users”, writes Scoble.

Scoble also made the charge that the WaSP is the marketing department of Opera. Haavard, of Opera’s Quality Assurance, writes “interestingly enough, much of Microsoft’s success can be attributed to marketing, but I guess it doesn’t feel good when you are on the receiving end.”

The most ridiculous claim of all Scoble writes, “If all the browsers have the same underlying features, and they should only add things that are standards, what differentiation are you offering your customers and investors? Are you saying Firefox’s developers can’t propose anything new that’d push the Web forward? Hey, how about some linking technologies like Greasemonkey? Is Firefox not allowed to add anything like that that the W3C didn’t propose and that the WaSP didn’t approve of?” Haavard made some interesting comments on this, I wont repeat them here, you can read them in his journal.

Though these are Scoble’s personal opinion and not that of Microsoft, it does point out the general attitude of Microsoft.

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  1. March 17, 2005 at 11:01 am

    It is NOT Opera’s Acid2 test, it is WaSP’s Acid2 test which Håkon is promoting. Please clarify your title.

    What a disappointing response from Scoble, not only is his indignation so misplaced as to be sadly amusing, he fails in even FUDing properly. I at least would have expected something of more substance, which is why I suspect it is not very representative of MS opinion (as I’m sure it would have been better executed if it was!) Read the comments for clear replies from Molly on his supposed “snub” and info from WaSP members past and present about MS’s persistent failure to work with WaSP for years. The comments also repeatedly break down his utter inability to FUD the distinction between standards and features. All calculators should at least add 2+2 to get 4 right?

  2. March 17, 2005 at 11:07 am

    non-troppo, here is what is says on the Acid2 test page:

    “The Web Standards Project will be hosting Håkon Wium Lie‘s acid2 test suite for CSS 2.1.”

  3. March 18, 2005 at 8:58 am

    “Are you saying Firefox’s developers can’t propose anything new that’d push the Web forward? Hey, how about some linking technologies like Greasemonkey? Is Firefox not allowed to add anything like that that the W3C didn’t propose and that the WaSP didn’t approve of?”

    I need only point to Web Forms 2, I think. That’s how the Web should progress. It doesn’t have to be the W3C, but it does have to be co-operative.

  4. March 18, 2005 at 12:18 pm

    Hi Daniel,

    Håkon is a clear standards advocate; just because he may also be Opera’s CTO does not mean this activity is coming from Opera at all. Here is what WaSP have to say:

    “In a public effort to encourage Microsoft to add as much CSS 2 support as possible as its developers embark on IE7, Håkon Wium Lie (CTO of Opera Software and the father of CSS) and the Web Standards Project have begun the development of a test suite, known as “Acid2.””

    Note it says Håkon & WaSP — not Opera and WaSP.

    Scoble has used this mis-perception as a justification to dismiss this project as an Opera publicity stunt, and the ridiculous suggestion that WaSP is some branch of Opera software – when if anything it is as close/closer to the gecko community.

    In the comments to Scoble, several WaSP member have made clear that this is going to be a collective test, designed to allow interoperability between browser vendors. Let’s not give Microsoft the ammunition to shoot Acid2 down.

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